Tag Archives: population

Will We Sustain Disruption or Disrupt Sustainability?

Dude, where’s my car? Buried beneath 4+ feet of snow in Buffalo, NY. Image from Huffington Post, click for source.

We live in an age that stumbles and staggers over disruption after disruption. Each year, month, week, day, hour, even minute something new interrupts the normal progress or activity of life and society. Droughts prevent farmers in California from planting and harvesting. New ride services like Uber and Lyft prevent cab companies from getting all the customers they used to in cities large and small. An Ebola epidemic prevents traditional rhythms of embrace and connection in West African communities. A six foot November snowfall prevents travel and commerce in Buffalo, NY.

What does this mean? How should we deal with disruptions? Should we, can we, hope to prevent them? Ignore them? Eliminate them? Control them? Reduce them? Prepare for them? Embrace them? Continue reading

Discovering John Stott’s Special Place

hooksesMy wife Susanna and I recently returned from a four week working trip to the UK. (See my last post). One of the highlights of that visit was a week in Wales staying, just the two of us, at the Hookses,  an old farmhouse and outbuildings purchased by John Stott in 1954.  This was his personal retreat – he wrote all but the last of his books here – and is now a small retreat center. Our stay was a profound experience for me… Continue reading

When Science and Faith Shook Hands

(Originally published March 31, 2009.  This is still an important meeting grounds for those of us involved in caring for creation–science helps us know how to best take care of God’s world.  There was a recent article on Today’s Christian Woman entitled, “Embracing Science” that gets into the nitty gritty of why faith and science go hand-in-hand, not in combat but in worship.)

It was a brief and on the surface completely unremarkable conversation. Two conference speakers complimenting each other on their talks, discussing points each one appreciated in the other’s presentation. Continue reading

Dateline: Singapore (continued)

via Flicker CC License - click for original

[This is part II of an extended post of observations gleaned during my current visit to Singapore.  See part I here.]

We left off with this statement: “this [Singaporean] miracle is more fragile than it appears.  It’s economic, ecological and political foundations are crumbling.  It would be surprising, to say the least, if the Singapore of 50 or 100 years from now was the same miraculous place it is today.”

Let’s unpack that a bit. Continue reading

Dateline: Singapore

via Flickr CC License - click for original

My wife Susanna and I are in the middle of a two week visit to Singapore.  This is an unusually long and delightfully leisurely visit compared with most of my overseas trips.  Because our youngest daughter lives and works here, we’ve come to see and experience her world as well as to share the creation care message in two conferences this week – which is why I’ve been able to experience and explore the city in a more relaxed manner than is usually possible.  These are some of my impressions after five days here – anecdotal, to be sure, but still valuable, I think. Continue reading

Egypt: A surprising creation-care connection

The Egyptian revolution now underway has a personal connection for me – my niece Annie is attempting to pursue graduate studies in the middle of the chaos.  I had a conversation with her mother, my sister Marilyn this morning:  “So what’s Annie doing?  Trekking to the airport every day to try to get out?”  “Not exactly – she’s trekking to demonstrations every day…” Anyone who knows Annie – heck, anyone who knows her mother – would not be at all surprised by that. Marilyn’s family lived in Egypt for a number of years, and she has been covering the crisis very competently on her blog here if you’d like a well-written day-to-day overview including occasional eye-witness reports from Annie.

There are so many dimensions to this uprising that it’s hard to know even where to start.  There are plenty of obvious dimensions of this crisis:  A hard-pressed population’s desire for freedom.  The fear many have of the possibility – maybe remote, maybe not – of an Iran-style Islamic state taking the reins after Mubarak leaves. Continue reading