Tag Archives: Kenya

Drought and famine (again)

 

Originally published July 18, 2011.  Farming God’s Way in Kenya is going strong today, continuing to provide “famine prevention” skills combined with discipleship training.

It has been a year of flood and drought.  This spring’s floods along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers are old news to most of us, as is the ongoing drought in Texas, which is breaking records set as long ago as 1917, long before the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s.   

 But nowhere in the world are things as bad as what is happening in East Africa, not far from where Craig and Tracy Sorley are serving in Kenya. 

 The Worst Drought in 60 Years

“Once More Into the Abyss”.   That’s how the Economist news magazine described the developing drought in Kenya and other East African countries a week or so ago:

BLOATED bellies with stick arms and legs; huge eyes staring out of skeletal heads; gaunt mothers trying to suckle babies on withered breasts. The world thought it might never see such scenes again. Famine in Africa, absent for many years, appeared to have gone the way of diseases for which we now have cures or vaccines. Continue reading

New Literature that’s worth reading: Tending to Eden by Scott Sabin

Originally published March 3, 2010.  Have you read Tending to Eden?

“Old Literature” is an occasional feature that highlights long-forgotten books, articles, speeches or poems that still speak to us today.  As it happens, there’s some new material that also deserves our attention.  Today, Tending to Eden by Scott Sabin, Director of Plant with Purpose (formerly Floresta).

Scott Sabin and I met about 7 years ago at a conference in Kenya.  He tells about that conference in his new book,Tending to Eden that was just released two weeks ago:

Edith and I took several pastors to a conference on creation care in Kenya.  I was one of the presenters, and in the course of my presentation I showed a slide of the devasted forests around Mt Kilimanjaro National Park.  Pastor Lyamuya approached me later and, with an embarassed smile, explained how convicting it was to see the photo from his own community.  “God entrusted it to us to take care of, and we aren’t doing our job.” Continue reading

Care of Creation Kenya makes an impact…

What exactly does an organization like Care of Creation Kenya (sister organization to Care of Creation Inc. which I direct) do, and whatever it is, does it make a difference?  Here’s a blog post from the Alliance for Religions and Conservation in the UK, reporting on the experience of a woman in Tanzania who took experienced one of CCK’s training programs in Nairobi.  Does it make a difference?  Judge for yourself:

A surprise phone call from Tanzania

By Susie Weldon, July 23, 2013:

ARC’s Susie Weldon on a visit to farming projects in Uganda

I was heading home from work near Bath, UK, the other day when I got the best call I’d had for weeks. I didn’t recognise the number but I knew it was from Africa. The voice on the line was Judith Atamba, a minister with the Methodist Church in Tanzania.

The last time I’d spoken to Judith was 14 months earlier, after she’d made the two-day trek from her post near Lake Victoria in Tanzania to attend a workshop I’d organised in Kenya on Farming God’s Way.

And now here she was on my mobile phone, her voice full of enthusiasm. “I want to tell you I’ve been going everywhere preaching about Farming God’s Way,” she shouted down the crackly line. “I tell everyone about it – and now I have managed to get a good piece of land to set up demonstration farms.” …

[Read the rest of the post on the ARC website here.]

How abusing God’s creation makes natural events unnatural

DSCN6254This post comes to you from an airport lounge in Nairobi, Kenya, where I am waiting for my flight to Tanzania to visit the new Care of Creation project in Iringa.  Meanwhile, I am thinking of the many people, sights and sounds from the last week.  One of the most important events is actually one that happened on April 28, a week before I arrived, when an unaturally large rainfall event caused a portion of the mountain above the community where our project is located to slide down.  Such an event is a natural part of God’s creation – or is it?

The evidence of God’s grace and mercy in the aftermath of the April 28th landslide in Kijabe, Kenya, is clear.  The slide happened after midnight on a Saturday night, so the path the slide took down the main street of the town (which runs straight down the slope) hit no vehicles, no houses and  no people.  It did wipe out several hundred meters of the boundary fence of Rift Valley Academy, and could have done serious damage to a local high school and the famous Kijabe Christian Hospital but for a strong fence and row of trees at the bottom of the street – and because of the damming effect of a railway line above the town – but we’ll come back to that in a minute. Continue reading

Repost: Old Literature: Cry the Beloved Country

I am currently in Kenya, being reminded once again of the enormous human toll caused by environmental degradation.  This post is four years old, but perhaps even more relevant than when first published:

Alan Paton wrote his novel in 1946, published in 1948.  It is set in South Africa.  What is startling about the book is that the first two pages could have been written about Kenya – and could have been written yesterday.

The lessons from today’s reading are painfully clear:  1)Environmental degradation is not a new problem.  Abuse of God’s creation is, apologies to Paton, as old as the hills.   As ancient as human nature.  If you’ll allow me to quote myself in Our Father’s World, ‘environmental problems are sin problems.’

And, 2)Why don’t we learn?  If it was obvious that people were destroying the very land they needed to live on more than 60 years ago, why do we keep acting surprised?  Why do we think we can solve this with more fertilizer or another loan from the World Bank?

Here’s the reading.  (Pick up the book here)

Continue reading

Pray for Kenya this week…

Just over five years ago, Kenyans went to the polls.  As in other countries, the election results were far from clear cut – but instead of taking to the airwaves or to the courts, Kenyans took to the streets with machetes and gasoline cans.  More than 1000 people were killed, the country came to a standstill for months, and thousands were displaced from their homes and farms.  It’s election time again in Kenya…

S0 I’m asking you to pray for this beautiful piece of God’s creation this week, that God’s peace will descend on it.  Things are different this time:  While the electorate remains ethnically divided, the major ethnic groups have chosen different partners – like the second half of an evening of bridge.  Where the Kikuyu and Luo were aligned last time against the Kalenjin, in this chapter it’s Kikuyu and Kalenjin against Luo and Kamba, with a fifth group, the Luhya, in a position to decide the election.

Confused?  So are some Kenyans, according to an excellent write up in the New York Times today: Continue reading