Tag Archives: guest post

“Be Fruitful and Multiply–Everybody

This is a cross-posting from our good friends and fellow creation care laborers at the A Rocha USA blog.  

By Tom Rowley, A Rocha USA Executive Director

American bison. CC License.

Last Wednesday, PBS launched a terrific new television series: EARTH A New Wild. Done in collaboration with Conservation International and Nature Conservancy (both of whom have partnered with A Rocha in the USA and abroad), the show focuses on the inextricable link between humans and nature. We are part of nature. We are mutually dependent. And neglect of one hurts the other.

All of which is a bit Continue reading

Backpacking and the Easy Yoke of Christ

by Lowell Bliss.  This is the second in a series of articles that grew out of Lowell’s trip to Rocky Mountain National Park this past October.  Click HERE to read part one.

A view of the Rockies. Photo by Brittany Ederer

A spiritual director recently advised me to identify my longings. After only a couple of days of prayerful reflection I thought I knew: I wanted to work for Jesus and make a contribution to the world (particularly in creation care and environmental missions), but in doing so, I didn’t want to be responsible for the world. I wanted to work restfully. In other words, I had a longing for the easy yoke of Christ.

The first step, it seemed to me, in pursuing my longings was to memorize Matthew 11:28-30. After that, I could pray through the passage regularly, leisurely, and intimately which I did so thusly:

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened,

Jesus, I come. And I certainly qualify because I am weary and burdened. Continue reading

Sun Worship in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park, courtesy of Lowell Bliss
Rocky Mountain National Park, courtesy of Lowell Bliss

Lowell Bliss’ monthly post.

For seven of the years my family and I lived in Varanasi, India, we resided in a house right on the western banks of the Ganges River.  From our rooftop first thing in the morning, we could look down on the riverfront and witness hundreds, sometimes thousands, of Hindu worshippers bathing in the Ganges.  At some point, they would cup their hands, draw up some water and then pour it in libation to the east from where the sun was rising.  They were in fact worshipping the sun.  I was a good enough cultural anthropologist to know why: the sun is a powerful luminary; it governs so much of life and health.  Studying Hinduism was not my first exposure to sun worship, neither was studying Continue reading

Naming again all the animals

Originally published August 31st, 2011.  Is it a woodchuck, or a groundhog?

Guest blog: by Lowell Bliss

As part of our summer vacation this year, we found ourselves at Canada’s Wonderland, a colossal amusement park near Toronto.  My teenage son has discovered roller coasters as a passion, and so we strapped ourselves into the Behemoth, riding up to a height of 230 feet and then plunging down at 77 mph.  The Behemoth cost $26 million to build.  But all day it was like that: we were surrounded by acres of ingenious and costly technologies engineered with the sole purpose to amuse and thrill.

As my old body began to wane in the late afternoon, I plopped down on a park bench and waited out my kids who were on another ride.   A young teenage girl was standing nearby.  Suddenly, I heard her utter a short squeak and I felt something rustling on the ground between my ankles.  I looked down.  A chubby woodchuck wandered out from under my bench.  Behind us was a small wooded lot between paths in the amusement park.  A little stream flowed into a pool there and it was hard to tell whether this patch of nature among the tarmac was original or manufactured.  Nonetheless, it was apparently where the woodchuck lived.  I suspect it was “suppertime,” if that’s what you can call his daily allotment of popcorn and funnel cake. Continue reading

Christian Camping and Creation Care – a formula for success!

Originally posted September 27th, 2011.  I (Brittany) am now a UW-Madison graduate and a full-time staff member at Care of Creation.

This summer Brittany Ederer, a student at UW-Madison, served as an intern in the Care of Creation office in Madison.  Based on her interest in camping, education nature and environment, we assigned her to start a survey project of Christian camps in Wisconsin, the upper Midwest and then throughout the country.  Are there Christian camps who are actively promoting creation care as part of their camp program?  Are they using creation care principles in caring for their properties?  This blog post is a preliminary report on a visit to one camp not far from Madison.  It turns out one of the best examples of creation care at camp is right in our own back yard.  We’re looking forward to a complete report from Brittany later on, but in the meantime, enjoy her thoughts on what’s going on at Timber-lee

Continue reading

Notes from a volcanic eruption in Iceland

Guest post by Bob White on the Holuhraun Eruption, Iceland, September 2014.  Cross-posted from the Science and Belief blog.

Robert (Bob) White, FRS is Professor of Geophysics at Cambridge University and Director of The Faraday Institute. He has recently published a book on Natural Disasters called Who is to Blame?
Nature, Disasters and Acts of God, (Oxford: Lion Hudson), 207 pp. ISBN 978-0-85721-4737

Picture: Einar Rafnsson/RUV. Click for source.

We arrived at the eruption site around midnight on 1st September 2014. We were fortunate to be there because it is in a 10,000 square kilometre exclusion zone in the interior of Iceland due to the danger of volcanic gases, floods and ash plumes. As scientists monitoring earthquakes caused by the eruption my team and I were part of just a handful of people allowed in. We stood in the middle of a black volcanic desert 3,000 feet high. The darkness of the night was uninterrupted by any human lights. And we knew there was no-one else within at least 100 kilometres of us in any direction. Continue reading