Tag Archives: God’s Creation

Guest Post – What’s In A Name?

Oregon Zoo Education Curator, Grant Spickelmier, sheds light on why God tasked humans with naming creation.

Original post from Green Jesus, shared with permission.

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When my son was two and half years old, he came to visit me at work. He was pretty excited because I am employed by one of the most kid-friendly workplaces in the world … the zoo!

After lunch, we walked through the tropics building to visit some of his favorite animals including the sun bears and the Komodo dragon. Next, we walked past a black and white animal with a stout body and a long nose. A woman standing nearby explained to her toddler, “Look honey, that’s an anteater.” My son tightened his grip on my hand and said “No!” He looked at the woman and corrected her loudly “No! That’s a tapir!” While slightly embarrassed, I felt a flash of pride sweep through me as I thought, “That’s my boy!” Continue reading

Loving Your Neighbor – The Case of The Nassau Grouper

A guest post from Bob Sluka:

We all know that as Christians we are commanded to love our neighbor. Jesus was famously asked “and who is my neighbor?” Had he been a marine biologist, Jesus might have answered with a story about Nassau grouper.

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Nassau grouper. Photo credit J.E Randall, www.fishbase.org

Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus) is a species of fish that lives in the warm, sub-tropical and tropical waters of the southeastern USA, Bahamas and the Caribbean Sea. It can grow to sizes over 1m and live to age 29. Unfortunately, it is also very tasty. Nassau grouper have become commercially extinct in many areas of the Caribbean and is on the US endangered species list. Continue reading

Join millions praying tomorrow for God’s creation

banner 1.0_smallFrom the Lausanne/WEA Creation Care Network “Global Day of Prayer 2016” guide.  Read and share the full flyer here.

Every year on September 1st the Catholic Church, Orthodox Church, and Protestants of all stripes come together in unity to pray for God’s good creation.

A Bit of History

The vision for this day started in 1989 when the late Patriarch Demetrios II installed September 1st as a Day of Prayer for Creation for the Orthodox Church. Then in response to Pope Francis’ 2015 encyclical on creation care, Patriarch Bartholomäus invited the Catholic Church to be united in prayer for creation with the Orthodox Church on September 1st. This led to Pope Francis’ announcing the annual Global Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation for the Roman Catholic Church, and invited other Christians to adopt this day too. Therefore, we, the Lausanne/WEA Creation Care Network, pray in the company of many faithful Christians and invite you to do the same.

Join Us In Prayer

We encourage you to personally pray for the care of creation on September 1st. Organize a prayer meeting focused on creation care at your church, in your small group, or just among a few friends.   If you are not able to lead a group or join a group, share specific creation care needs and concerns with your Christian friends on social media and invite them to pray for those issues with you.  

Be creative and have fun! Go outside for a prayer walk at a local park, beach, riverbank, community garden, or in your own backyard.  If it is evening, step outside and look up at the stars as you pray, or pray around a campfire.  Perhaps enjoy a wonderful meal and gratefully enjoy the fruits of creation. Continue reading

Global Day of Prayer for Climate Action: April 5th

Environmental problems are a spiritual struggle…that’s why we pray.

Everything we all need is provided by God’s creation–if we seek justice, love mercy and walk humbly with our God.

Join dozens of organizations and hundreds of individuals around the globe praying for a unified response to climate change issues.  Even as Christianity is spreading and growing around the world, many still face increasing challenges to their livelihoods and health due to environmental degradation.

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What Role Does Faith Play? God Draws Straight with Crooked Lines…

Kermit Hovey pausing during a bike ride through a forested path in 2013.
Kermit Hovey pausing during a bike ride through a forested path in 2013.

“What role does faith play in you discovering and living your purpose?”  Last year I met Sterling Lynk, strategist and coach, at the Madison Non-Profit Day conference. He chose to interview me about that question and the particulars of my story of faith, purpose and work at Care of Creation.

In his article at www.mightypurpose.me, Sterling introduces the topic before sharing both an invitation to Care of Creation’s April 18th Tenth Anniversary Celebration and his interview with me.  A partial excerpt follows:

“Sterling Lynk: Tell us a little about Continue reading

Insects: A Climate Change solution?

Too cute to eat?

One UW-Madison grad student was not just driven buggy by the climate change crisis, she was driven to bugs for a solution. My interview with Valerie Stull about her and Rachel Bergmann’s mighty MIGHTi project (Mission to Improve Global Health Through Insects)aired on WORT-FM March 17, 2015. Their unconventional idea brings a small solution – insects – to help with two big problems: hunger and climate change. As Stull explains, meal worms provide a highly efficient source of edible protein requiring 1/5th the feed per pound than beef. Additionally, meal worms produce none of the potent green house gas methane that beef cattle does.  Listen here (about 4 minutes).

By Mnolf (Photo taken in Rum, Tirol, Austria) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Larvae of the meal worm beetle (Tenebrio molitor), before (dark) and after skinning (light)
How does raising meal worms and other insects equal a “win-win-win?” In their own words,

“Insects can feed people, serve as an inexpensive feed source for poultry as well as fish, and are relatively easy to raise. Farming insects is also climate smart, as they require less energy to produce and emit fewer greenhouse gases than other livestock. They can even recycle agricultural waste products, not edible for people. In areas where food is not always available and protein sources are scarce, insect farming offers an inexpensive, environmentally friendly option. (1)

What creative problem-solving!  UW Madison’s Climate Quest competition awarded Stull and Bergmann top prize for their project’s creative potential to impact climate change in 2015. It may even have more potential than those of us acculturated  in the industrialized west may give it credit for.

In case you’re still skeptical about eating bugs, remember that John the Baptist did just fine on a diet of locusts and honey (Mark 1:6 ; Matthew 3:4 ).  For more examples of insect eating (called “entomophagy”) throughout history, check out National Geographic’s “Bugs As Food: Humans Bite Back” and“For Most People, Eating Bugs is only Natural”.

(a version of this post by Kermit Hovey originally appeared at www.climatechangehope.wordpress.com )