Tag Archives: climate change

Energy Slavery and What it Means to be Human

Two of the cutest energy slaves in cinematic history.

Following last week’s post by Brittany Ederer, Standing Face to Face with Injustice, today we explore what seems to be a quite different topic – our dependence on what some call “energy slaves” – and we discover that the similarities to and connections with human slavery and injustice are deep and real.

Make no mistake:  “Real” human slavery remains a serious issue in our modern world.  By some estimates, there are more slaves today than there were at the height of the slave trade,  perhaps as many as 35 million human beings trapped in some form of slavery.  This is tragic and shameful – and those organizations dedicated to confronting this problem and correcting it are worth noting and supporting. Continue reading

On living on a finite planet

Originally posted January 6th, 2011.  

 

Do we live in a world of limitations or one of potentially inexhaustible resources?

Wayne Grudem, writing in Politics According to the Bible, makes this rather astounding statement in an attempt to persuade his reader that there’s really nothing to worry about with regard to the global environmental crisis:

“Long term trends show that human beings will be able to live on the earth enjoying ever-increasing prosperity, and never exhausting its resources.” (p. 332)

I’ll be doing an in-depth review of Grudem’s book in the near future – let’s just say for now that it’s kind of hard to believe that he and I are living on the same planet.  Case in point: two different news items over the last couple of days: Continue reading

Intimations of Mortality

Originally published August 13, 2010.

William Wordsworth’s most famous work is Ode: Intimations of Immortality From Reflections of Early Childhood.” It is one of my favorite poems, exploring the lost pleasures of childhood that Wordsworth believes are hints of the immortality we left behind:

It is not now as it hath been of yore;—
Turn wheresoe’er I may,
By night or day,
The things which I have seen I now can see no more.

And again,

Not in entire forgetfulness,
And not in utter nakedness,
But trailing clouds of glory do we come
From God, who is our home:
Heaven lies about us in our infancy!

Setting aside theological mysteries and controversies for another day, what has preoccupied me for that last month and a half has not been immortality, past or future, but increasing intimations of mortality:  My own,as I have experienced an unusual and thought provoking spell of genuine illness, something unusual for me; but also increasing intimations of mortality in the world in which we live, highlighted by the Gulf oil spill but buttressed by a host of other events. Continue reading

Discovering John Stott’s Special Place

hooksesMy wife Susanna and I recently returned from a four week working trip to the UK. (See my last post). One of the highlights of that visit was a week in Wales staying, just the two of us, at the Hookses,  an old farmhouse and outbuildings purchased by John Stott in 1954.  This was his personal retreat – he wrote all but the last of his books here – and is now a small retreat center. Our stay was a profound experience for me… Continue reading

Moon Memories Move Emotion, Climate Action

I cried in Washington, D.C.

It happened in a narrow opening of time, an eye of the storm between flying in to Reagan International Airport the day before and sitting down for the first Citizens’ Climate Lobby 2014 Conference session that Sunday, June 22 afternoon. I took a morning stroll to find some

Washington National Cathedral, home of the stained glass “Space Window” with embedded lunar rock and site of Astronaut Neil Armstrong’s 2012 memorial service.
Washington National Cathedral, home of the stained glass “Space Window” with embedded lunar rock and site of Astronaut Neil Armstrong’s 2012 memorial service.

spiritual grounding within the architectural and liturgical beauty of the renowned Washington National Cathedral. Strikingly, I found it most profoundly not in the 11 am worship service on the spacious main floor. I found it more in the 1 pm docent led tour discussing the stained glass “Space Window”.

The docent explained the Space Window had been dedicated in 1974 on the fifth anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. In it was sealed a seven gram rock sample from the Sea of Tranquility presented by Neil Armstrong, the first man to set foot on the moon,
and his Continue reading

A Tale of Two Speeches , Two Video Clips, and Two Missions

Lowell Bliss’ monthly post.

© Reuters / Adrees Latif.
Tuesday, September 23 was an important day that featured a significant speech by President Obama. Ban Ki-moon had scheduled a one day U.N. Climate Summit as a way to invigorate stalled international negotiations on the reduction of carbon emissions and the expansion of adaptation efforts. President Obama was one of 120 government leaders to attend. Like the other heads of state, he was given a few minutes to address the gathering and by extension, the peoples of the world. Upwards to 400,000 of those people—including many evangelical Christians—had participated in the People’s Climate March two days earlier on the streets of New York City. What answer would Obama and the other world leaders give them?  Continue reading