Tag Archives: agriculture

“Our Father’s World” documentary with Pastor Joel Hunter, Bill Hybels, etc.

Originally published March 20, 2013.  Enjoy!

We haven’t had many really quality creation care video products come out recently; this one is an exception.  Pastor Joel Hunter of Northland Church in Orlando narrates, there are clips from Bill Hybels, Scott Sabin, Tony Campolo, Mark Liederbach and many others, along with beautiful photography and a consistent powerful message:  It’s not our world, it belongs to God.  And we have to take care of it.

The film runs about a half an hour, but it is worth the time.  Highly recommended for those of your friends who might be wondering about this creation care stuff but aren’t quite sure.  (Also recommended – the book of the same title that has no connection to the film… !)

Enjoy!

“It’s Complicated”: An Update on the Monarch Butterfly

Two months ago I posted a story here on the fate of the Monarch butterfly which many of you read and shared. This week we have an update from the New York Times that is worth reviewing briefly. There is good news and bad news, and, for me, a new sense of how complicated these things are. Many of us who are trying to help may not have been helping as much as we thought.

So listen up – this is important for the butterflies, and for us. Continue reading

Drought and famine (again)

 

Originally published July 18, 2011.  Farming God’s Way in Kenya is going strong today, continuing to provide “famine prevention” skills combined with discipleship training.

It has been a year of flood and drought.  This spring’s floods along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers are old news to most of us, as is the ongoing drought in Texas, which is breaking records set as long ago as 1917, long before the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s.   

 But nowhere in the world are things as bad as what is happening in East Africa, not far from where Craig and Tracy Sorley are serving in Kenya. 

 The Worst Drought in 60 Years

“Once More Into the Abyss”.   That’s how the Economist news magazine described the developing drought in Kenya and other East African countries a week or so ago:

BLOATED bellies with stick arms and legs; huge eyes staring out of skeletal heads; gaunt mothers trying to suckle babies on withered breasts. The world thought it might never see such scenes again. Famine in Africa, absent for many years, appeared to have gone the way of diseases for which we now have cures or vaccines. Continue reading

Not-so-old Literature: Wendell Berry and the Pleasure of God

Originally published June 9, 2009.

Wendell Berry [courtesy Wikipedia Images]
Wendell Berry (courtesy David Aaron Marshall)
“Wendell Berry (born August 5, 1934, Henry County, Kentucky) is an American man of letters, academic, cultural and economic critic, and farmer. He is a prolific author of novels, short stories, poems, and essays. He is also an elected member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers.” – thus Wikipedia introduces one of my favorite authors.  Among his many achievements, however, he is not listed as a theologian.

Continue reading

New Literature that’s worth reading: Tending to Eden by Scott Sabin

Originally published March 3, 2010.  Have you read Tending to Eden?

“Old Literature” is an occasional feature that highlights long-forgotten books, articles, speeches or poems that still speak to us today.  As it happens, there’s some new material that also deserves our attention.  Today, Tending to Eden by Scott Sabin, Director of Plant with Purpose (formerly Floresta).

Scott Sabin and I met about 7 years ago at a conference in Kenya.  He tells about that conference in his new book,Tending to Eden that was just released two weeks ago:

Edith and I took several pastors to a conference on creation care in Kenya.  I was one of the presenters, and in the course of my presentation I showed a slide of the devasted forests around Mt Kilimanjaro National Park.  Pastor Lyamuya approached me later and, with an embarassed smile, explained how convicting it was to see the photo from his own community.  “God entrusted it to us to take care of, and we aren’t doing our job.” Continue reading

Whales, spray cans and chickens: Sometimes we do things right!

The environmental movement has been criticized at times for being too negative and ‘alarmist’.   Now, you have to be fair to those of us who study these things closely. There is usually little to be positive about and plenty of things to be frightened of. I could tell you things that I seldom mention in a public lecture, things that never make the news but that would keep you up most nights and make your skin crawl (especially if you are raising a family right now). If there really is a fire in the theater, being an “alarmist” is an obligation, not a crime.

On the other hand, I will confess that it is tempting at times to spend so much time looking at the crisis that we can ignore legitimate good news. So, at least for today, let’s set the bad news aside, and review three legitimate “good news” stories: Continue reading