Videos from the 2012 Consultation on Creation Care and the Gospel

2012-11creationcare-groupThe Lausanne Global Consultation on Creation Care and the Gospel met from 29 Oct – 2 Nov 2012 in St. Ann, Jamaica to build on the creation care components of the Cape Town Commitment.  We were a gathering of theologians, church leaders, scientists and creation care practitioners, fifty-seven men and women from twenty-six countries from the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, Latin America, Oceania, North America and Europe.  We met under the auspices of the Lausanne Movement in collaboration with the World Evangelical Alliance, hosted by a country and region of outstanding natural beauty, where we enjoyed, celebrated and reflected on the wonder of God’s good creation. Many biblical passages, including reflections on Genesis 1 – 3, Psalm 8 and Romans 8, informed our prayers, discussions and deliberations on the themes of God’s World, God’s Word and God’s Work.  Our consultation immediately followed Hurricane Sandy’s devastation of the Caribbean and coincided with that storm’s arrival in North America; the destruction and loss of life was a startling reminder as to the urgency, timeliness and importance of this Consultation.  Click to see the complete list of videos. Continue reading

Care of Creation Kenya makes an impact…

What exactly does an organization like Care of Creation Kenya (sister organization to Care of Creation Inc. which I direct) do, and whatever it is, does it make a difference?  Here’s a blog post from the Alliance for Religions and Conservation in the UK, reporting on the experience of a woman in Tanzania who took experienced one of CCK’s training programs in Nairobi.  Does it make a difference?  Judge for yourself:

A surprise phone call from Tanzania

By Susie Weldon, July 23, 2013:

ARC’s Susie Weldon on a visit to farming projects in Uganda

I was heading home from work near Bath, UK, the other day when I got the best call I’d had for weeks. I didn’t recognise the number but I knew it was from Africa. The voice on the line was Judith Atamba, a minister with the Methodist Church in Tanzania.

The last time I’d spoken to Judith was 14 months earlier, after she’d made the two-day trek from her post near Lake Victoria in Tanzania to attend a workshop I’d organised in Kenya on Farming God’s Way.

And now here she was on my mobile phone, her voice full of enthusiasm. “I want to tell you I’ve been going everywhere preaching about Farming God’s Way,” she shouted down the crackly line. “I tell everyone about it – and now I have managed to get a good piece of land to set up demonstration farms.” …

[Read the rest of the post on the ARC website here.]

Creation Care and Lausanne: A new Awakening?

For the next four weeks I will be guest-authoring a series on Lausanne and Creation Care on InterVarsity’s Emerging Scholars blog.  Part 1 has just been posted.  Here’s how it starts:

The “whole gospel” includes caring for God’s creation.

That is one important conclusion that comes from reading the landmark Cape Town Commitment (CTC) the latest signature document of the Lausanne Movement. The CTC is historically important for the entire evangelical family, but particularly for those of us involved in the creation care movement…

Read the rest at the Emerging Scholars Blog here.

Climate Change and Creation Care as seen from the Congo

Spring 2013 class

At Care of Creation we were recently contacted by a Christian University in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  A group of students there was looking to publish a jointly-written report on environment and climate change as they experience it.   The following article, written by students from Université Chrétienne Bilingue du Congo/Christian Bilingual University of Congo (UCBC), highlights some recent creation care activities in the surrounding communities.  DRC is a nation wearied by war, severe poverty, governmental ineptitude, and endemic corruption.  It is in this context that the activities described in the report reveal something of the character of UCBC–an institution whose vision is to “raise up indigenous, Christian leaders to transform their communities and the nation of DRC.”  Read, ponder – and pray.  And let us know if you would like to help in some way.  (This article is cross-posted on the main Care of Creation website. The authors are Adeito Masika Tahirana, Annie Mboligihe, Baraka Kambale Alex, Nadine Kavira Vitya, and Patrick Masomeko Mikajo.)

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the majority of the population is rural and lives dependent on the forest and subsistence farming. DRC’s Congo Basin rainforest is sometimes referred to as the  “second lung of the earth” because of its size, second only to the Amazon basin. However, through the growing lumber industry, people who live in this vast rainforest area often seek to supplement their livelihood by clearing forest trees to sell timber and produce charcoal for cooking. As the population grows rapidly, this activity has direct impacts on climate and the health of the land as the rainforest shrinks to make way for farmland and the lumber industry.

Continue reading

A Prayer…

shalomThe Lausanne Movement has just held a Global Leadership Forum in Bangalore India that I was privileged to participate in.  One of the features of the program was ‘interactive sessions’ combining different but related topics.  Mine was called “Pursuing Shalom” and incorporated people and presentations representing Creation Care, Business as Mission, Science and Bioethics, Technology and Integral (or Holistic) Mission.  If your initial reaction is ‘what do these have in common?’ stop and think for a minute:  They represent the biggest challenges facing the human race in general and the church in particular as we move into the future. The end product of six hours of meeting together was nothing more than a prayer… but it is a significant and important prayer: Continue reading

A Tale of Two Cities

I flew into Dubai early yesterday morning from a two week stint in Kenya and Tanzania.  Coming from one of the least developed areas of the world – I spent a week without electricity and running water – into one of the most developed cities on earth and home to the world’s tallest building, I was reminded of this article which I wrote for The Other Journal three years ago after a similar trip.  Enjoy…

There are few air hops that will give you a greater contrast than the four-hour trip from Nairobi to Dubai.

Nairobi is the capital of one of the poorer nations in the world, the home of the infamous Kibera slum, and a textbook case of how population growth, rapid unplanned development, and massive environmental degradation result in poverty and human suffering. Flying out of Nairobi, you can see signs of distress in every direction just by looking out of the plane window.

Dubai is one of the wealthiest cities on earth. Flying into Dubai, evidence of prosperity is as obvious as the poverty of Nairobi. High-rise buildings grow out of desert sands, massive highways clog with traffic. The terminal itself is more of a shopping mall with jetways than an airport: a temple to consumerism. Every imaginable gadget, garment, and trinket is on offer at prices that may be as low as anywhere else in the world.

But there’s another way to look at these cities. Let’s rewind and put on a different set of glasses:

Read the rest of the article here.

If the theme interests you, pick up a copy of my latest book, When Heaven and Nature Sing at careofcreation.net or on Amazon.