All posts by Ed Brown

A Walk in the Woods

Bill Bryson spent several months walking the Appalachian trail in order to write his book, A Walk in the Woods.  I just spent an hour on a bike trail near my home in Madison WI yesterday afternoon.  Bill got a whole book (yes, it’s worth reading – go find it!), while I got about five paragraphs, though in terms of words per hour invested, I’m probably ahead of him.  In terms of useful thoughts, you’ll have to let me know.  It was a profitable hour for me: Continue reading

Countdown to Cape Town: Redemption and Creation Care

Originally published 9/27/2010, this post is at the heart of our core convictions at Care of Creation.

This is a continuation of a series of articles leading up to the third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization that begins in Cape Town South Africa on October 15.  Today’s post is a continuation of the last as we move from the Fall to Redemption. Find the whole series to date here.

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Like many kids, young and old, I used to enjoy playing with dominos.  Not playing the game, you understand, but playing with the tiles.  Setting them up in long chains, and when all was ready, carefully knocking the first one over.  If all went according to plan, each domino would knock the next one in the line, and one by one, all would fall over.  We used that image above to describe the series of relationships shattered by Adam and Eve’s disobedience.  As we think of how they are restored by redemption through Jesus, the same domino imagery is useful again.  As the domino tiles fall, each pushes on the next, and eventually all are lying flat.  But if you want to pick them up, you have to start with the first one that fell over, not with the last one. They have to be set up in the order in which they fell. The same is true as we begin to restore relationships broken by sin. Continue reading

Tu B’Shvat – Happy New Year for the Trees

Originally posted Jan. 29th, 2010.  This year, Tu Bishvat is celebrated on February 4th.  

Today’s bit of new knowledge:

Tu B’Shvat in the Jewish calendar begins this evening at sunset – New Year’s Day for Trees.  Here’s a bit of an explanation from Rabbi Yehuda Prero:

The Gemora, when discussing cures for ailments, writes that “a tree that loses its fruits before they ripen should be dyed with a red paint.” What is the point of dying the tree with red paint? How does the red paint prevent the tree from losing its fruits before they ripen? Continue reading

2015 is going to be a very big year for creation care

Happy New Year!2015 may turn out to be one of the most important years in recent history for the environmental movement, for the evangelical creation care movement, and for us and our organization, Care of Creation.  Here’s what’s happening:

Anniversaries
There are a lot of significant anniversaries to celebrate:

  • The 45th anniversary of the celebration of Earth Day comes in April.
  • Personally, it will be 15 years since I joined Au Sable Institute and moved from a traditional ministry framework into what we then called Christian environmental stewardship, now commonly referred to as creation care.
  • And this year marks 10 years since Craig Sorley and I started Care of Creation in April 2005.  We had a modest goal of promoting “environmental missions” that quickly became a passion to mobilize the worldwide church for creation care.  Now, thanks to the prayers and financial support of many of you, we are leading a global effort to do just that.  (We’ll be having a birthday party in Madison on April 18 – mark the date, and plan to join us!)

Continue reading

Christmas Light

mangerWe shared this devotional with our various newsletter mailing lists this year, and we thought this would be an appropriate message for our blog audience this week.

Happy Christmas!  May you experience its unique light in your life, as we have!  Please feel free to share your thoughts and responses in the comment section or on our Facebook page.

–Ed Brown for the Care of Creation family

The people walking in darkness have seen a great light;
on those living in the land of deep darkness a light has dawned.
“I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never
walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”
Isaiah 9:2, John 8:12

For those of us who live in the northern half of the world, Christmas comes at the darkest time of year. Beginning in June, the sun rises later and sets earlier every day, a psychological burden made worse by the device of “daylight saving time”, which now has daylight ending at 4:30 in the afternoon in our hometown of Madison WI. It could be worse: People in Anchorage, Alaska, don’t see the sun until after 10 am and lose it by 3 pm. (Those of you who live near the equator with sunrise and sunset that never changes, cannot possibly understand this – but you can empathize with the rest of us.)  Continue reading

Intimations of Mortality

Originally published August 13, 2010.

William Wordsworth’s most famous work is Ode: Intimations of Immortality From Reflections of Early Childhood.” It is one of my favorite poems, exploring the lost pleasures of childhood that Wordsworth believes are hints of the immortality we left behind:

It is not now as it hath been of yore;—
Turn wheresoe’er I may,
By night or day,
The things which I have seen I now can see no more.

And again,

Not in entire forgetfulness,
And not in utter nakedness,
But trailing clouds of glory do we come
From God, who is our home:
Heaven lies about us in our infancy!

Setting aside theological mysteries and controversies for another day, what has preoccupied me for that last month and a half has not been immortality, past or future, but increasing intimations of mortality:  My own,as I have experienced an unusual and thought provoking spell of genuine illness, something unusual for me; but also increasing intimations of mortality in the world in which we live, highlighted by the Gulf oil spill but buttressed by a host of other events. Continue reading